A healthy and engaged workforce is key to improved organisational productivity and financial performance. More and more organisations worldwide realise this and take steps to develop and implement health and productivity strategies that promote employee well-being.

Interest in health and productivity is nearly universal. In our 2015/2016 global Staying@Work Survey, nearly 90% of respondents in EMEA said that improving workforce health and productivity is a core component of their organisation’s overall health strategy, and nearly all (97%) said they are committed to health and productivity improvement in the years ahead. They believe these programmes will reduce their employees’ health and risks and improve their overall health and well-being, which in turn will lead to better business outcomes.

Success of health and well-being programmes depends on the ability to connect with employees, yet employer and employee perspectives often diverge.  This divergence is most apparent when it comes to sources of stress. Employers highlight work/life balance issues, but employees are focused on the right resources to do their work, adequate pay, a clear understanding of priorities and a work environment that allows them to be effective.

Key highlights from the EMEA report are noted below and the full report can be accessed by clicking the 'download PDF' link.

Key highlights

EMEA employers are committed to improving workforce health and productivity with 9 in 10 saying it is a core component of their organisation’s overall health strategy.

Towers Watson Media

Employers are clear about the goals they have set for their health and well-being programs. Their top priorities are improving and maintaining workplace performance, raising employee awareness of health and health-related risks, boosting programme engagement, improving and maintaining workplace safety, and reducing stress.

Employers are clear about the goals they have set for their health and well-being programs
Click to enlarge

A number of factors are keeping employers’ health and well-being programmes from being as successful as they could be. Among the top factors are lack of adequate resources (budgets and staff) to support their programmes, fragmented delivery of these programmes, lack of organisational structure, lack of data to support targeted outreach and lack of measurable return on investment.

A number of factors are keeping employers' health and well-being programmes from being as successful as they could be
Click to enlarge